Divorce, Custody, & Family
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Maine Sexual Assault Resources: Child Sexual Abuse & Normal Child Sexual Behavior

How do I know if my child’s sexualized behavior is normal or a sign of abuse? Some child sexualized behavior is normal. Other behavior may be a sign of abuse. Here are some resources that may help you know the difference: 

Maine Child Protection: What happens when DHHS investigates a household?

This is the second part of our guide to Child Protection proceedings in Maine. It covers what can happen when DHHS investigates a household because they believe that a child may be at risk of being harmed.

Maine Child Protection: What does DHHS do when they get a complaint of child abuse?

This guide is the first in a series about what happens when DHHS gets involved with families. This guide covers the very first steps in the Maine Child Protection process - our other guides cover later parts of this process. If you are in a situation where DHHS is becoming involved with your family, start here.

Healthcare Resources for Maine Children Who Have Experienced Violence

How does domestic violence affect children? Violence and trauma can have long-lasting effects on children who witness or experience violent events.

Child Abuse and Neglect in Maine: DHHS Substantiation and Indication

About DHHS and Child Abuse and Neglect DHHS Child Protective Services investigates reports of child abuse. There are 5 different things that DHHS can do:

What Concerned Adults Can Do to Protect an Endangered Child

You can file a Three-Person Petition (also called a Three-Party Petition) in District Court. Under the Maine Child Protection laws, three or more people can file a Child Protection petition, asking the Court to order DHHS or a third party like a relative to take custody of and provide services to a youth...

Military Retirement Pay and the Collection of Child and Spousal Support

Federal and State Law Federal and state law allow money from military retirement pay to be withheld to meet most child support and spousal support (alimony) obligations.

Parents on Active Duty: Legal Considerations

Your rights as a parent do not stop when you are in the military and called to active duty. There are many things to consider and plan for, especially if you are separated from your child’s other parent.  This is a summary of some of the relevant Maine laws that may help you understand your rights.

Military Search for Service by Alternative Means

If you are starting a family law case (such as a divorce or setting parental rights and responsibilities), you must tell the other party that you are bringing a court action against them. You do this by "serving" the other party. This means that you give copies of your court papers to the other party. Court rules tell you how this must be done.

Divorce and Separation: Where Can I Get Help?

Lists resources for people who are separating or going through divorce: where to get legal and financial help, and other support services.